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Bios of Notable Thomasites

21 June 2011

This is a collection of mini-biographies of notable American educators who have left their personal marks in the history of many Filipino learning institutions.  While they are collectively called “Thomasites”, not all were passengers of the historic USS Thomas.  Some were soldiers who stayed or returned after the Spanish-American War.  Others belonged to the waves of teachers who gravitated to what was then an American colony, the Philippines.  The names are listed alphabetically.

[You can find a complete listing of American teachers assigned to the Philippines (as of 1902) here.  The research notes after the article include links to other sites.  Access to some are subject to subscription.]

Joseph E. Allen was born on April 1860 in Davenport, Iowa to an American father (Maine) and an Irish mother, Margaret Allen.  His siblings were Elijah and Mary.  He was already set up as a school principal when he received his foreign teaching appointment in October 1901, at an annual salary of $1,200. He moved to the Philippines with his wife Minnie and two children in 1902, to help establish the public school system.  He was stationed in Naga, Cebu, where he contracted small pox and died after three weeks on 29 April 1903.  He was buried just outside the local cemetery.  Find his family tree here.

George P. Anderson was born in Illinois in 1865.  He was 5’8″ and had light brown hair and blue eyes.  After graduating from the Yale Divinity School, George worked as a teacher.  On 04 May 1898, he enlisted as a private in Portland, Oregon under Company H of the 2nd Regiment of the Oregon Infantry — volunteers in the Spanish-American War in the Philippines.  On 12 June 1899 , he was discharged from service in Manila to became the country’s Superintendent of Instruction, taking over from Fr. William D. McKinnon.  George and his wife Mary resided in Seattle, Washington after his service in the Philippines.  He died from pneumonia on 01 July 1932.

Atkinson

Fred Washington Atkinson was born in 23 May 1865 in Reading, Massachusetts to George Washington Atkinson (a retail grocer from New Hampshire) and Eliza Atkinson (from Maine).  His siblings include George, Eddie, Harry and Willie.  His wife was Winnifred Whitford Atkinson.  Fred received his A. B. from Harvard University in 1890; and his Ph.D. from the University of Leipzig in 1893.  As an educator, he held prominent positions in various institutions:  Head of Science Department, Westfield High School (MA), 1891; University of Berlin, 1891; University of Halle, 1892; Universities of Jena and Sorbornne, 1893-1894; Principal, Springfield High School (MA), 1894-1900.  Dr. Atkinson was appointed the Superintendent General of Public Instruction by the Philippine Commission on 05 May 1900, and he served in this capacity until 1903.  His time in the Philippines gave him the opportunity to learn about life in the archipelago — his resource in writing the book “The Philippine Islands“, which was published in 1905.  He continued to lead a successful career as an educator – Superintendent of Schools, Newton, MA., 1904; President, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, NY, from 1904; Member, Board of Education, New York City, 1916-1918.  He was 6’4″ tall, and had brown hair and blue eyes.  Find his family tree here.

William H. Badger was born in 1867.  He was among the pioneering teachers who moved to the Philippines in 1902 to establish the public school system.  He died from cholera-induced blood poisoning on 01 August 1902 in Malasiqui, Pangasinan.  His widow, Viola Badger, accompanied by their two small children, stayed to teach in Manila.

Barnaud

Albert Joseph Barnaud was born in Spencer, Worcester, MA on 24 April 1882 to immigrant parents — Elie Barnaud of France and M.L. Cornelia Amolette from French Canada. In 1903, Albert Joseph Barnaud graduated from the College of the Holy Cross (a Jesuit-run liberal arts college). He moved to the Philippines to help establish the Philippine public school system in July 1903, where he was assigned in Tagbilaran, Bohol as a supervising teacher. During his stay in the Philippines, the multi-lingual Albert joined the Esperanto Association, a global movement which tried to promote an international language, Esperanto. Albert met a young Filipina and sired a son, Arturo. When he left the Philippines in June 1913, he was working as a cashier at the Manila Hotel. Upon returning to the United States, he worked primarily as a trade executive for the Bureau of Commerce. He married Marie T. Keane and had a family together. Albert was 5 feet 5 inches tall with brown hair and brown eyes. He died in Los Angeles, California on 20 August 1960 at the age of 78. Find his family tree here.

Josephine Baugh moved to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system.  She died of Asiatic cholera on 25 August 1903 in the Philippines.

Bennett

Roy DeWitt Bennett was born on 06 May 1884 in Findlay, Ohio to Rawson Corwin Bennett and Anna Wall.  He was among the later waves of educators who moved to the Philippines to establish the public school system.  From 1918 to 1922, Roy was the principal of Nueva Vizcaya High School.  He married a Filipina, Josefa Camaguian Cutaran of Bayombong, Nueva Viscaya, with whom he had 4 children. His son, Roy Anthony Cutaran Bennett, became the editor of the Manila Bulletin in the 1940′s. His daughter, Helen Cutaran Bennett was crowned Miss Visayas at the 1936 Manila Carnival and served as Foreign Secretary to President Elipidio Quirino. He died on 30 March 1968 in Pasadena, California at the age of 83.  Find his family tree here.

Frederick Douglass Bonner moved to the Philippines in 1902 with his wife Charlotte. They were two of a handful of African American who joined the movement to establish the Philippine public school system.  Fred was assigned to teach in Subic, Zambales.  Three of their four children were born in the islands.  The family returned to the United States in the late 1910s, where Fred worked as a public accountant.  Find his family tree here.

Storts-Buckisch

Buckisch

Walter G.M. Buckisch was born on 20 December 1888 in Iowa to German immigrants, Christian (a pastor) and Valeske Buckisch.  He was 5’11″ tall and had brown hair and blue eyes.  He came to the Philippines in 1912, belonging to the later waves of American teachers.  His experiences as a teacher in foreign barrios were documented in the anthology  “Tales of the American Teachers in the Philippines” published in 1959.  His wife, Laura Storts-Buckisch of Ohio was also a teacher; and their son, Herbert William, was born in the Philippines in 1928.  The family resided along 66 Naglatan Street, Manila.  He died on 16 January 1975 in Los Angeles, California at 86.  Find his family tree here.

John Henry Manning Butler was born on 05 September 1868 in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. He was one of a handful of African Americans who travelled to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the Philippine public school system. His first station was Alominos, Zambales.  His wife Fannie soon followed and gave birth to their son, Hood, in the Philippines in 1909.  In his stay in the islands, he amassed 100 hectares of rice fields in Cagayan and Isabela Provinces, 1,379-square meter residence in San Juan, Rizal and a library with 1,000 volumes. Dr. Butler died on 15 March 1944 in Mandaluyong, Philippines.  Find his family tree here.

Ira A. Collins came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system.  While crossing the strait from Bais, Negros Occidental to Samboan, Cebu, he fell from a local banca and drowned on 29 January 1902.  His body was buried in Dumaguete, Negros Occidental.

Dorothy E. Conant arrived in the Philippines in early 1902 to marry Mr. David E. Conant and travelled with him to his station in Bais, Negros Occidental, where she died on 23 June 1902 from a pregnancy-related hypermesis.  Her husband returned to the United States with her remains.

Price W. Cooper came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system and was assigned to teach in Laoag, Ilocos Norte.  He died of smallpox on 07 April 1903 in the Philippines.

Crow

Joseph William Witton Crow was born on 04 January 1874 in Hollister, San Benito, California to William G. Crow (a farmer and land owner, originally from Missouri) and Angeline Whitton (a native of California).  His siblings were Emma, Warren, Annie, Dixie and Hugh.  He appeared in the 1900 US Census as a 26-year old school teacher, living with his widowed father and siblings.  He came to the Philippines in 1902  as a pioneering teacher aboard the Transport Thomas, and was assigned to Nabua, Camarines Sur.  He was then assigned to Iloilo where he fell in love with Asuncion de Ocampo, a Filipina from Capiz, Iloilo.  They married in 1910 and were blessed with 9 children.  By 1915, he was serving as the Provincial Treasurer of Batangas.  Joseph and his family became prominent members of Manila society at the height of the American Occupation.  His daughter, Charity Paz Crow, was crowned Miss Luzon at the 1933 Manila Carnival.  He was 5′ 8″, had light blue eyes and was missing his left thumb.  Find his family tree here.

W.S. Davis came to the Philippines with his family in 1901. Sadly, he was among the list of casualties within the first twenty months after the arrival of the USS Thomas. He died of appendicitis on 22 September 1901 in Dagupan, Philippines, after which his wife and four children made the somber trip back to the United States.

Mary H. Fee came to the Philippines in 1902 aboard the USAT Buford. When she arrived in the Philippines, she was stationed as a teacher in picturesque Capiz, Capiz.   In 1907, she published, together with three others, an English language reader “The First Year Book“, which was part of the Philippine Education series.   Her life in the islands became an inspiration for her book “A Woman’s Impressions of the Philippines“.

Clyde O. France of Berea, Ohio left New York on 22 February 1902 to become a teacher in the Philippines. After a brief stay in Manila, he, Ernest Heger, Louis A. Thomas and John E. Wells left for Cebu where they were to await their station assignments. The group left on the morning of 10 June 1902 for a photography walk in the northern foothills, even after being warned by Constabulary Inspector Ross of dangerous outlaws in the area. His remains, and those of his companions, were recovered on 23 July 1902.

William B. Freer came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system and was stationed in Nueva Caceres, Camarines Sur.  He related his experiences teaching in a foreign barrio in a book  “Tales of the American Teachers in the Philippines” published in 1959.

Walter Gilliam came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system and was stationed in Bato, Catanduanes.  He died of smallpox on 07 July 1903 in the Philippines.

Gubisch

Arthur Williams Gubisch was born on 28 January 1873 in Glogan, Germany.  He arrived in the United Stated in 1888, when he was 12.  He enlisted as a private in US Army on 15 June 1894 in Chicago, Illinois when he was 22 yo and 5 months and working as a clerk at the time.   By the time he served his second tour of duty in 1898, he was promoted to Sergeant.  During the 1900 US Census taken in the American camp, in San Isidro, Philippines, he listed his residence as 2466 Sprague Street, Omaha, Nevada.  He was honorably discharged from military service in 1897 at Fort Yakes in North Dakota.  In November 1901; he got his teaching appointment , for which he wss going to earn In 1902:  1,000, Arthur was assigned to San Isidro, Tunisan, Laguna.  He married a Filipina, Aufronia Filomena Apolonia Reyes, of Apari, Cagayan, and their union was blessed with 9 children.  Later in life, he became a Constabulary Inspector.  He died on 10 December 1952 at age 79 in Labangon, Cebu, Philippines and was buried in the veterans’ plot of the municipal cemetery.  Find his family tree here.

Loren C. Guernsey was born on 19 May 1869 in Schoharie, New York to George W. Guernsey (a farmer) and Janthra Guernsey — both New York natives. He was 5’8″ tall and had blonde hair and blue eyes.  In 1895, he graduated with honors from Union College in Schenectady, New York, where he excelled in extemporaneous speech.  Loren came to the Philippines in 1901 to help establish the public school system. Sadly, he was among the list of casualties within the first twenty months after the arrival of the USS Thomas.  He died from diphtheria on 02 May 1902 in Balayan, Batangas, Philippines.  He left his wife, Minnie (also a teacher) and three small children — Bernard, Iva Lucinda and Loren Paul (born in the Philippines) — who eventually returned to the United States.  Find his family tree here.

Hamme

William Rockford Hamme was born on 20 January 1887 in York, Pennsylvania – one of 9 children of Daniel L. Hamme and Salome Blair, both natives of Pennsylvania.  He lived in Atchison, Kansas before moving to the Philippines in June 1916, part of the latter waves of American teachers.  He was stationed in Iloilo, Iloilo.  He related his experiences teaching in a foreign barrio in a book  “Tales of the American Teachers in the Philippines” published in 1959.  He was 5’10″ tall and had brown hair and brown eyes.

Ernest Heger of Cinncinati, Ohio left New York on 22 February 1902 to become a teacher in the Philippines. After a brief stay in Manila, he, Clyde O. France Louis A. Thomas and John E. Wells left for Cebu where they were to await their station assignments. The group left on the morning of 10 June 1902 for a photography walk in the northern foothills, even after being warned by Constabulary Inspector Ross of dangerous outlaws in the area. His remains, and those of his companions, were recovered on 23 July 1902.

Robert R. Jamizon came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system.  He died from Asiatic cholera on 31 May 1902 in Dinalupihan, Bataan, Philippines.

Joshua B. Kirkpatrick came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system and was stationed in Ayuquitan, Negros Oriental.  He died from Asiatic cholera on 15 August 1903 in the Philippines.

Lot Dean Lockwood was born on 20 February 1879 in Yuba, California to Thomas J Lockwood and Albertina Brown — both natives of Connecticut.  He came to the Philippines, belonging to the later waves of American teachers.  He married Goldie Elizabeth Donhan on 19 September 1919.  Sadly, she died barely a year later in Manila on July 1920.  He remarried in 1923 — his new wife, Bertha.  His experiences as a teacher in foreign barrios were documented in the anthology  “Tales of the American Teachers in the Philippines” published in 1959.  Find his family tree here.

Herbert Lucker came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system.  He died from Asiatic cholera on 06 August 1902 in Laoag, Ilocos Norte.

W.E. Lutz was born about 1867 and came to the Philippines in 1902, with his wife, who was also a teacher.  Sadly, Mariam Lutz died of Asiatic cholera in Manila on 24 Jul 1903 at the age of 32, even before she could go to her station.  He continued his work as a teacher, founded the Iloilo Normal School and served at its first principal.  This institution grew to become what is now the Iloilo National High School and the West Visayas State University.  Mr. Lutz was remembered as a “very kind and understanding man”.

Marquardt

Walter William Marquardt was born on o8 Sep 1878 in Dayton, Ohio.  He came to the Philippines as a pioneering teacher in 1902, and was first assigned to Tanauan, Leyte.  In his early years in the barrio, upon introduction of gardening, he related how his students brought their servants to tend to the plots — a reminder of the class system the Spanish instituionalized.  He spent 18 years in the country — his three sons were all born in Manila.  In 1921, he penned a pamphlet called “What Filipino Students Coming to America Ought to Know“, which became an important guide for government pensionados.  He was 5’7″ and had grey eyes and brown hair.  He died on 02 November 1946 in Crow Wing, Minnesota.  One of his sons, Frederick S. Marquardt wrote an essay about the life of early American teachers in the Philippines, which was included in the anthology “Tales of the American Teachers in the Philippines” published in 1959.  Find his family tree here.

Walter Roy Matthews from Lansing, Michigan came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system.  He was found dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound on 19 February 1903 in the town he was stationed in, Pitogo, Tayabas.  He was buried on a knoll in the local churchyard.

William D. McKinnon was the parish priest of St. Joseph’s Parish, Rio Vista, California from 1893 to 1897.  In 1898, he was commissioned to serve as the Chaplain of the First California Regiment and was sent to the Philippines to attend to the spiritual needs of the troops who were fighting the war against Spain.  He is credited by some scholars as the broker behind the surrender of Manila.  Three weeks after the city of Manila was occupied by American forces, the twice-wounded chaplain was made Superintendent of Schools and Cemeteries.  Seven public schools were immediately opened, each handled by a soldier assigned to teach English.  Fr. McKinnon died on 25 September 1902.  He had a sister name Mary E. McKinnon — she filed to receive his pension in 1907 in California.  On 25 January 1906, a military battery (a fortified structure for the storage of heavy guns) in San Francisco was named after the chaplain.  In 1927, a statue of Fr. McKinnon was commissioned by the Bay Area Spanish-American war veterans and erected in the San Francisco Golden Gate Park.

Roderick G. McLeod born on 05 March 1875 in Scotland and was a naturalized American citizen.  He came to the Philippines as a young teacher in 1902, and was assigned to Pila, Laguna.  By 1914, he was the Superintendent of the Philippine School of Arts and Trade (now the Technological University of the Philippines).  His wife, May and daughter, Ruth May, joined him in the islands in 1925.

D.C. Montgomery was born to D.W. Montgomery in Nebraska.  He moved to the Philippines with his wife, Eva Montgomery (also a teacher), to serve as the Division Superintendent of Schools for Negros Occidental.  The couple was headquartered in Dumaguete.  D.C. was murdered on 31 October 1902 by ladrones (outlaws) as he was travelling between Talisay and Bacolod.

Moses

Bernard Norton Moses was born on 28 Aug 1846 in Burlington, Connecticut.  He is one of at least 6 children of farmer Richard Moses and Rachel Norton.  He had been an educator at the University of California, was an original member of the Philippine Commission, serving  from 16 March 1900 to 31 December 1902, drafted Act No. 74 or the “Education Act of 1901″, which resulted in the revamp of the Philippine public school system.   He served as the country’s Secretary of Public Instruction, closely working with Fred Atkinson, his Superintendent-General.  He moved to the islands with his wife, Edith Moses.  The couple had one child, Aurea.   He was 6 feet tall and had dark brown hair and grey eyes.  Find his family tree here.

Harry W. Nash was a Sergeant in Captain Buck O’Neil’s company of Rough Riders, who fought the Spanish-American war in Cuba. After leaving military service, he received his teaching appointment in Manila in June 1902, for an annual salary of $1,200. He died of cerebral hemorrhage in Manila on 05 July 1902. The Elks Club forwarded his remains to his sister in Globe, Arizona.

Levona P. Newsom moved to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system and was stationed in Lingayen, Pangasinan.  She related her early experiences as a teacher in a foreign barrio in the book, “Tales of the American Teachers in the Philippines”.

John J. O’Donnel Jr. moved to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system and was stations in Licab, Nueva Ecija.  He died of Asiatic cholera on 22 August 1903 in the Philippines.

Franklin C. Osborn was born in February 1876 in Wood, Wisconsin.  He worked as a farmer until he enlisted in Company H, 22nd US Infantry on 12 July 1899 and was among those who fought the Spanish-American war in the Philippines. Franklin was a Sergeant when he mustered out in Manila in January 1902; and received his teaching appointment in February 1902.  He was offered an annual salary of $900.  Franklin had only recently returned to Baler, Tayabas (where he was once stationed as a soldier) to take on a teaching post, when we was struck with dysentery. He was awaiting the medical transport to Manila when he died on 08 June 1902 in Baler, Tayabas, Philippines, where he was also buried.

Orman K. Osborn was born in 1876 to O.M. Howard of South Dakota.  He moved to the Philippines  to help establish the public school system.  While in his teaching station in Bolinao, Zambales, he joined a party hunting outlaws and was shot in a confrontation with the ladrones.  He died from the gunshot injuries on 24 January 1903 at the age of 27.  He was buried in the same town.  His widow, Antonia Osborn, a native woman, resided in Manila.

Polley

Mary E. Polley was born on 01 March 1871 in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin to Hackley Polley, a farmer, originally of Warkworth, Canada and Amanda Polley, a nurse from Massachusetts.  She had two siblings, Delilah and John.  Mary came to the Philippines as a pioneering teacher aboard the Transport Thomas.  She was first assigned to Santa Barbara, Iloilo where she, in support of Principal WE Lutz, began the Iloilo Normal School in 1902.  This institution grew to become what is now the Iloilo National High School and the West Visayas State University.  She also served the President of the Philippine Normal School (now a University) in Manila from May 1929 to December 1929.  She wrote educational materials, like the reader “Rosa and her Friends“, in a continuing effort to make books which reflected the Philippine experience.  Mary never married.  She died on 31 Jan 1953 in Pasay City, Philippines at the age of 81.  Find her family tree here.

Mae I. Ross came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system and was stationed in Lucban, Tayabas (now Quezon).  She died from amoebic dysentery on 03 January 1903 in the Philippines.

Vernon E. Skiff came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system and was stationed  in Bauag, La Union.  He died from smallpox on 02 February 1903 in the Philippines.

Summers

George Robert Summers of Grand Chain, Illinois moved to the Philippines to help establish the public school system.  He was in Fulton, Missouri when he received his appointment in October 1901 to teach in the islands, at an annual salary of $1,000.  He was initially assigned to teach in Cauayan, Ilocos Sur.  He stood 5 foot 8 inches tall and had dark brown hair and brown eyes.  In Ilocos, he met a young lass from a prominent local family, Trinidad Guerrero Agcaoili — whose older brothers benefited from the Pensionado Act of 1903 and were able to pursue engineering degrees at Cornell University. The couple eventually moved to Manila where he took on the role of Superintendent of Schools and Asst. to the Director of Public Schools. His address is recorded to be 512 San Luis, Manila.  He accompanied the Philippine National Track and Field Team to the 3rd Far Eastern Championship Games held in Tokyo, Japan in May 1917. He returned to the United States with his family when he retired. Upon his death, his daughter Helen Summers-Brown took his extensive collection of Filipiniana books as the “seed” with which she founded the Filipino American Library in Los Angeles.  Find his family tree here.

Bessie Taylor-Thompson moved to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system and was stationed in Balanga, Bataan.  Her early difficulties as a teacher in the barrio was documented in “Tales of the American Teachers in the Philippines“.

Louis A. Thomas  of Rhode Island left New York on 22 February 1902 to become a teacher in the Philippines. After a brief stay in Manila, he, his cousin John E. Wells, Clyde O. France and Ernest Heger left for Cebu where they were to await their station assignments. The group left on the morning of 10 June 1902 for a photography walk in the northern foothills, even after being warned by Constabulary Inspector Ross of dangerous outlaws in the area. His remains, and those of his companions, were recovered on 23 July 1902.

Woodson

Carter Godwin Woodson was born in 19 December 1875 in New Canton, Virginia to former slaves, James and Elizae Woodson (both Virginia-born). He became a school supervisor in the Philippines between 1903 and 1907 — one of a handful of African American Thomasites. He wrote personal letters which alludes to problems he had with Filipinos in the Bureau of Education, which contributed to his departure. Upon his return to the United States, he continued his studies at the University of Chicago and Harvard University. He was drafted in 1918 to take part in WWI. Carter was one of the first scholars to study African American history and in 1916, was the founder of the “Journal of Negro History”. In 1926, he pioneered the celebration of what is now called “Black History Month”.  Find his family tree here.

Robert P. Walker came to the Philippines in 1902 to help establish the public school system and was assigned to Argao, Cebu.  He died from smallpox on 03 July 1903 in the Philippines.

John E. Wells of Rhode Island left New York on 22 February 1902 to become a teacher in the Philippines. After a brief stay in Manila, he, his cousin Louis A Thomas, Clyde O. France and Ernest Hegerleft for Cebu where they were to await their station assignments. The group left on the morning of 10 June 1902 for a photography walk in the northern foothills, even after being warned by Constabulary Inspector Ross of dangerous outlaws in the area. His remains, and those of his companions, were recovered on 23 July 1902.

Wrentmore

Clarence George Wrentmore was born on 15 December 1867 in Solon, Ohio to George W. Wrentmore, an English migrant farmer, and Susannah Wrentmore. His siblings were Alson and Ernest. He was a professor of engineering at University of Michigan (1893-1911) when he answered the call to be a pioneering educator. He moved to the Philippines in 1912 with his wife, Margaret Wrentmore (nee MacFarla) and his young children — George, Elizabeth, Gwyneth and Margaret. He served as the Dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Philippines and was a practicing civil engineer from 1912 to 1919. Find his family tree here.

R. Zumstein arrived in the Philippines in 1902 and was stationed as  a teacher in Nagcarlang, Laguna.  He left for Manila to meet his fiancee who was arriving on the July transport.  They were married on 21 July 1902 at 8 o’clock in the morning and he died from Asiatic cholera at 1 o’clock in the afternoon on the same day.  Mrs. Jeanette Zunstein received her teaching appointment in Manila in August 1902 (for an annual salary of $1,000) and replaced him in his provincial post.

Research Notes:

- “The Arthur W. Gubisch Project“.  Geni.com.  Date accessed:  23 June 2011.
- “Assassinated in Cebu“.  New York Times.  24 July 1902.  Date accessed:  24 June 2011.
- “Battery McKinnon“. Fortwiki.com. Date published: 30 March 2011. Date accessed: 24 June 2011.
- “Bearers of Benevolence”. ed. Racelis, Mary and Ick, Judy Celine.  Pasig:  Anvil Publishing, 2001.  Appendix A.
- “California Passenger and Crew Lists, Record for John H Manning Butler“, 1928. Ancestry.com. Date accessed: 05 July 2011.
- “Carter G. Woodson’s Missing Letters“. Thomasites Blog. Date published: 01 October 2010. Date accessed: 05 July 2011.
- Castro, Alex.  “1933 Miss Luzon, Miss Visayas, Miss Mindanao“.  Manila Carnivals.  Date published:  19 May 2009.  Date accessed:  23 June 2011.
- “Chaplain McKinnon Looks for a Speedy Termination of the War“.  New York Times.  30 October 1899.  Date accessed: 24 June 2011.
- “Chaplain William D. McKinnon statue (1927)“.  FourSquare.com.  Date accessed:  24 June 2011.
- “Civil War Pension Index, Record for William D. McKinnon. 1903“.  Ancestry.com.  Date accessed:  24 June 2011.
- “Commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the founding of Union College“.  Union College. 1895.  Date accessed:  24 June 2011.
- “Fred Washington Atkinson“.  GenealogyMagazine.com.  Date accessed:  24 June 2011.
- “Historical Background“.  Nueva Viscaya General Comprehensive High School.  Date published: 2010.  Date accessed: 23 June 2011.
- “Iloilo National High School“. IloiloDirectory.com. Date accessed: 22 June 2011.
- “INHS History“. Tribu Bola Bola. Date published: 27 April 2000. Date accessed: 23 June 2011.
-  Marquardt, Rod. Email exchange dated 24 June 2011.
- “Mary E. Polley“. Philippines Deaths and Burials, 1726-1957. FamilySearch.org.  Date accessed:  22 June 2011.
- McGonigle, Thomas D., McGonigle, Thomas C. and Quigley, James F.  “A History of the Christian Tradition: From the Reformation to the present“.  Paulist Press, 1996.  Page 158.  Date accessed: 24 June 2011.
- “Mrs. WE Lutz“. Philippines Deaths and Burials, 1726-1957. FamilySearch.org.  Date accessed:  23 June 2011.
- “New York Passenger Lists, Record for Walter G M Buckisch“, 1915.  Ancestry.com.  Date accessed: 25 June 2011.
- “News of Union College“.  New York Times.  27 May 1895.  Date accessed:  22 June 2011.
- “NYU-Poly Timeline“.  NYU-Poly.edu.  Date accessed: 24 June 2011.
- “Oregon in the Philippines“. US Department of War, undated. Page 13.  Date accessed: 24 June 2011
- “Past Presidents“. Philippine Normal University. Date accessed: 22 June 2011.
- “Philippines Deaths and Burials, Record for William H. Badger“, 1902.  FamilySearch.org.  Date accessed: 25 June 2011.
- Pollack, Chris and Katz, Erica.  “San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park“.  Graphic Arts Center Publishing Company, 2011.  Page 53.  Date accessed: 24 June 2011.
- “Reports of Deaths of American Citizens Abroad, Record for John H Manning Butler“, 1944.  Ancestry.com.  Date accessed:  05 July 2011.
- “Since 1868“.  St. Joseph’s Parish, Rio Vista site. Date accessed: 24 June 2011.
- “Taft Commission“.  Wikipedia.  Date published: 12 June 2011.  Date accessed: 25 June 2011.
- “Technological University of the Philippines“.  Wikipedia.  Date published: 22 June 2011.  Date accessed: 23 June 2011.
- “U.S. Army, Register of Enlistments, Record for Franklin Osborn“, 1899. Ancestry.com. Date accessed: 24 June 2011.
- “U.S. Federal Census, Record for Franklin C. Osborne“, 1900.  FamilySearch.org.  Date accessed: 24 June 2011.
- “U.S. Federal Census Record for Fred D. Boner“, 1880.  Ancestry.com.  Date accessed: 05 July 2011.
- “U.S. Federal Census Record for Fred D. Boner“, 1900.  Ancestry.com.  Date accessed: 05 July 2011.
- “U.S. Federal Census Record for Fred D. Boner“, 1920.  Ancestry.com.  Date accessed: 05 July 2011.
- “U.S. Federal Census Record for Fred D Boner“, 1930.  Ancestry.com.  Date accessed: 05 July 2011.
- “U.S. Federal Census, Record for Fred W. Atkinson“, 1880.  Ancestry.com.  Date accessed: 22 June 2011.
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5 Comments leave one →
  1. 23 August 2011 12:17

    Sana ay makatulong ang blogspot na ang link ay nasa ibaba, upang magkaroon pa kayo ng karagdagang at komprehensibong inpormasyon sa ilang mga Thomasites na na-assigned bilang mga principal ng Indang Intermediate School (KNA Cavite State University)

    http://cvsu-indang.blogspot.com/

    my email
    magsasaka@gmail.com

    • Mona permalink
      23 August 2011 13:34

      Salamat, Cvsu! Napakarami pang mga Thomasite na kailangang hanapin at bigyang-pugay. Kailangan ko pa ng mga katulad mong matulungin. Salamat sa contribusyon!

  2. 12 June 2012 05:50

    Hi Mona. Greetings from New Mexico, USA. I am interested to know if you have run across any records that link the recruitment of Thomasites among Indian boarding school teachers here in the American southwest? Certainly, we now have “tons” of Filipino teachers who have been/are being recruited to serve among Native Americans. Many gain instant acceptance among native communities because of the similarity of their cultural ties and reverence to family. Salamut!

    • Mona permalink*
      12 June 2012 06:15

      Hi, Ted. My data on recruitment is limited to the first batch Thomasites (1901-1902) — New Mexico was not mentioned. Of course the state was only formed in 1912. If you come across fresh data, do share!

  3. 6 January 2013 09:23

    I was fortunate enough to stumble upon this post. Your research is for this period is very thorough. Thanks for sharing.

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